I should probably be writing my two Hackney Citizen articles due at the end of the week, or prepping for my CNBC interview, but instead I’m booking tickets for the Ghosts of Fleet Street tour: 

This mesmerising tour tells the chilling story of British journalism from its inky medieval beginnings to its 20th-century heyday and destruction. The victims of the “feral beast” will be brought to life — from the daredevil printers dismembered by royal censor Sir Roger l’Estrange in the 1660s to the noblemen exposed and humiliated in courtesan Kitty Fisher’s explosive sexual memoirs in the 18th century, from a rhinoceros who propped up the bar of a Ludgate Hill tavern in the 1670s to the hapless Admiral Byng, sent to a watery grave by the Monitor newspaper in 1757 in the first media witch hunt.

September 21st can’t come soon enough. 

Drowning in books and I couldn’t be happier

There are worse things than a new pile of books, but nothing better.

Take a look at this haul! 

  • Never Again, Britain 1945-51 (Hennessy)
  • The Blair Effect, 2001-2005 (Seldon and Kavanagh)
  • Essential Public Affairs for Journalists (Morrison) 
  • Essential Law for Journalists (Welsh, Greenwood and Banks)
  • English for Journalists (Hicks)
  • News Writing (McKane)
  • Journalism, a Career Handbook (McKane) 
  • The NCTJ Essential Guide to Careers in Journalism (Bull)

Most of them came from my friend and pub co-worker after I badgered him incessantly to lend me all his now-unused university texts…he really shouldn’t have told me he studied history and journalism. But now they’re all mine (and for keeps). This is pure educational gold. 

I’m also reading Andrew Marr’s book, My Trade: A Short History of British Journalism. The Kindle says I’m about 16% through, but so far

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Behind the barriers at Thatcher’s funeral procession

image

A woman sits with flag and photo in hand near St. Paul’s Cathedral. (Kalyeena Makortoff photo)

Pomp, patriotism and police were the defining features of Iron Lady Margaret Thatcher’s funeral procession today. I joined hundreds, if not thousands, of Brits who gathered for the display—some to pay respects, but many, it seemed, simply to say “I was there” and savour a slice of history. I’m aware that I fell into the latter group: one of the mere observers, waiting to see the hearse roll by. Waiting to see who would cheer and aware that somewhere along the way, trouble might be brewing. 

I didn’t camp out overnight, but I should have arrived a little earlier than 9am. Crowds were 3, to 5, to 10 people deep around St. Paul’s and down Ludgate Hill. 

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notnadia:

elision:

Horrible Histories - Richard III

What, like I wasn’t going to post this today?

Topical.

(Source: youtube.com)

journalofajournalist:

(via Former Hartford Advocate Writer Brews Unemployed Reporter Porter - WCCT)

This is amazing.
Also, someone please give me a job.

journalofajournalist:

(via Former Hartford Advocate Writer Brews Unemployed Reporter Porter - WCCT)

This is amazing.

Also, someone please give me a job.

fjp-latinamerica:

The press freedom situation in the Americas
Reporters Without Borders just released their annual Press Freedom Index [PDF], along with this map.
The annual global indicator can also be broken down by region and, by means of weighting based on the population of each region, can be used to produce a score from zero to 100 in which zero represents total respect for media freedom. 
This produces a score of 17.5 for Europe, 30.0 for the Americas, 34.3 for Africa, 42.2 for Asia-Pacific and 45.3 for the former Soviet republics. Despite the Arab springs, the Middle East and North Africa region comes last with 48.5.
Here are some of the key findings concerning our region:
Jamaica and Costa Rica are the highest ranking country from the Americas, just ahead of Canada, the western hemisphere’s traditional leader. 
On the other hand, Cuba is still at the bottom, next to the usual underachieving countries: Syria, Iran, China, Sudan, Yemen, and the like. 
Mexico is one of the biggest disappointments, largely due to the high number of journalists and netizens killed therein. That ratio is similar to that of Somalia, Syria, and Pakistan. 
Argentina fell amid growing tension between the government and certain privately-owned media about a new law regulating the broadcast media.
Chile is beginning to recover after plummeting 33 places in last year’s index (student protests).
A lack of pluralism, intermittent tension with the political authorities, harassment and self-censorship are the main reasons for the scant change in Nicaragua, Guatemala and Panama, where attacks on journalists tripled in the space of a year, local unions said. 
Brazil, South America’s economic engine, continued last year’s fall because five journalists were killed in 2012. Its media landscape is also badly distorted. Heavily dependent on the political authorities at the state level, the regional media are exposed to attacks, physical violence against their personnel, and court censorship orders, which also target the blogosphere.
Paraguay fell eleven places in the rankings after its President’s removal in a parliamentary “coup” on 22 June 2012, which had a big impact on state-owned broadcasting along with a wave of arbitrary dismissals against a backdrop of unfair frequency allocation.
In general, Uruguay, Portugal, Spain, El Salvador, Haiti, the United States and the Dominican Republic have been doing fairly good lately. In contrast, Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador and Honduras, delivered bad news this year (as expected). 
Read on for the full regional analysis.
FJP: We at the Future Journalism Project have been reporting on these issues for the last few months, hence the popularity of press freedom as a frequent discussion topic in these pages. So, please go ahead and follow us on Twitter.
Image: Adjusted partial screenshot of Freedom of the Press 2013 Map, via Reporters Without Borders.

fjp-latinamerica:

The press freedom situation in the Americas

Reporters Without Borders just released their annual Press Freedom Index [PDF], along with this map.

The annual global indicator can also be broken down by region and, by means of weighting based on the population of each region, can be used to produce a score from zero to 100 in which zero represents total respect for media freedom.

This produces a score of 17.5 for Europe, 30.0 for the Americas, 34.3 for Africa, 42.2 for Asia-Pacific and 45.3 for the former Soviet republics. Despite the Arab springs, the Middle East and North Africa region comes last with 48.5.

Here are some of the key findings concerning our region:

  • Jamaica and Costa Rica are the highest ranking country from the Americas, just ahead of Canada, the western hemisphere’s traditional leader. 
  • On the other hand, Cuba is still at the bottom, next to the usual underachieving countries: Syria, Iran, China, Sudan, Yemen, and the like. 
  • Mexico is one of the biggest disappointments, largely due to the high number of journalists and netizens killed therein. That ratio is similar to that of Somalia, Syria, and Pakistan. 
  • Argentina fell amid growing tension between the government and certain privately-owned media about a new law regulating the broadcast media.
  • Chile is beginning to recover after plummeting 33 places in last year’s index (student protests).
  • A lack of pluralism, intermittent tension with the political authorities, harassment and self-censorship are the main reasons for the scant change in Nicaragua, Guatemala and Panama, where attacks on journalists tripled in the space of a year, local unions said. 
  • Brazil, South America’s economic engine, continued last year’s fall because five journalists were killed in 2012. Its media landscape is also badly distorted. Heavily dependent on the political authorities at the state level, the regional media are exposed to attacks, physical violence against their personnel, and court censorship orders, which also target the blogosphere.
  • Paraguay fell eleven places in the rankings after its President’s removal in a parliamentary “coup” on 22 June 2012, which had a big impact on state-owned broadcasting along with a wave of arbitrary dismissals against a backdrop of unfair frequency allocation.
  • In general, Uruguay, Portugal, Spain, El Salvador, Haiti, the United States and the Dominican Republic have been doing fairly good lately. In contrast, Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador and Honduras, delivered bad news this year (as expected). 

Read on for the full regional analysis.

FJP: We at the Future Journalism Project have been reporting on these issues for the last few months, hence the popularity of press freedom as a frequent discussion topic in these pages. So, please go ahead and follow us on Twitter.

Image: Adjusted partial screenshot of Freedom of the Press 2013 Map, via Reporters Without Borders.

I’m as obsessed with space as…Russia apparently
Last week, I couldn’t contain my excitement when Chris Hadfield held a press conference from the International Space Station. FROM SPACE. Oh man.
I may want to be a journalist now, but at one point I definitely wanted to be an astronaut. Especially after I shook hands with an astronaut—that could very well have been Hadfield—in Grade 7 (or was it 6?) when he came to our town and we gave him a plaque for…uh… Well, my memory is hazy but I remember feeling inspired. (Not that I ever pursued science or math…but that’s besides the point)
Now I can’t stop reading space stories. But I’ve noticed that a good number of them are about Russia. And while NASA has sent a rover to Mars, and Hadfield is teaching us how to clip our nails in zero-gravity, Russia is outdoing us all and I feel like I’ve been transported to the Cold War. 
Yep, they’re making sure the Olympic torch takes a trip to the International Space Station. No, it’s not enough to take it ‘round the country, let’s get that sucker into space! You know, where there’s no…gravity.  
Oh, and they’re going back to the moon, sending an unmanned craft to search for water. Don’t they know it’s made of cheese? 

I’m as obsessed with space as…Russia apparently

Last week, I couldn’t contain my excitement when Chris Hadfield held a press conference from the International Space Station. FROM SPACE. Oh man.

I may want to be a journalist now, but at one point I definitely wanted to be an astronaut. Especially after I shook hands with an astronaut—that could very well have been Hadfield—in Grade 7 (or was it 6?) when he came to our town and we gave him a plaque for…uh… Well, my memory is hazy but I remember feeling inspired. (Not that I ever pursued science or math…but that’s besides the point)

Now I can’t stop reading space stories. But I’ve noticed that a good number of them are about Russia. And while NASA has sent a rover to Mars, and Hadfield is teaching us how to clip our nails in zero-gravity, Russia is outdoing us all and I feel like I’ve been transported to the Cold War. 

Yep, they’re making sure the Olympic torch takes a trip to the International Space Station. No, it’s not enough to take it ‘round the country, let’s get that sucker into space! You know, where there’s no…gravity.  

Oh, and they’re going back to the moon, sending an unmanned craft to search for water. Don’t they know it’s made of cheese? 

The Ubyssey has been nominated for the most JHM student journalism awards out of any Canadian university newspaper this year (That’s 7!). So proud!
Aww, The Ubyssey remembers me! I never knew this photo was at their disposal. Also, the girl in front of me looks pissed. 

The Ubyssey has been nominated for the most JHM student journalism awards out of any Canadian university newspaper this year (That’s 7!). So proud!

Aww, The Ubyssey remembers me! I never knew this photo was at their disposal. Also, the girl in front of me looks pissed. 

"General hopes for a comfortable war — one that could be completed without emotional wounds — haven’t been fulfilled. Indeed, Bryan’s world has melded with that of the child in Afghanistan. It’s like a short circuit in the brain of the drones."

Dreams in Infared: The Woes of an American Drone Operator

reuters:

Winkler: Debunking the myths of gun rights in America 

In the wake of the Sandy Hook school massacre, legislators have returned to the debate over gun rights. Adam Winkler, a professor of constitutional law at UCLA and author of “Gun Fight,” breaks down the myths surrounding the Second Amendment and the history of gun control in the U.S.

I will never back gun rights, but this is an interesting and nuanced look at America’s relationship with right to bear arms.